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Announcing the Release of “Promises of Home – Stories of Canada’s British Home Children

July 15, 2014

ANNOUNCING THE RELEASE OF:

book cover

A band of child pilgrims in mass exodus, numbering 100,000, spanning seven decades (1869-1939), arrived in Canada. Like seed, they were scattered from Atlantic to Pacific, not in handfuls as would have been appropriate for children, but in singles, one here, another there. Hampered by the derogatory label, Home Child, severed from their familial connections, against the odds, they took root and became grounded and sturdy enough to change the landscape of our young Dominion.

Promises of Home is a collection of Home Child stories.

In time, against the odds, most became proud Canadians and many prospered. Their stories, and what became of them beg to be told. Most shunned the limelight while they lived and wouldn’t want anyone to make a fuss over them now. Ethel Parton Crane expressed an attitude common to the Home Children when she said,  “I made the best of it. What else could I do?”

The time has come to cry over the abuses they suffered, to applaud their successes and to say, as a nation, “thank you.”

The author, Rose McCormick Brandon is a descendant of four British Home Children. She writes books and publishes articles on faith, personal experience and the Child Immigration Scheme. She lives in Caledonia, Ontario.

Contact me at rosembrandon@yahoo.ca

Follow me on twitter @rosembrandon

To purchase Promises of Home, click here.

Praise for Promises of Home

Rose McCormick Brandon has given our British Home Children a voice. Her book will go a long way at unlocking some important untold stories. Jim Brownell, Former MPP, responsible for The British Home Child Day Act in Ontario.

Written with a sensitivity that can only come from an author who understands and empathizes with the trials, tribulations and successes of these special children; these are stories that simply had to be told. Lori Oschefski, Founder/CEO, British Home Children Advocacy & Research Association.

Through books such as Promises of Home all citizens have the opportunity to know about the boys and girls and the contributions they made to Canada in peace and in war. John A.G. Sayers, British Isles Family History Society of Greater Ottawa

Promises of Home takes readers on a colourful journey into the lives of the British Home Children who helped build and shape Canada. Phil McColeman, Member of Parliament, Brant.

 

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5 Comments leave one →
  1. Mary Arnold permalink
    July 16, 2014 1:48 am

    Rose I am so happy your book is now for sale , of course mine is already ordered, can’t wait to read all these stories , about these poor children , England threw away. Canada gained by having them come here , unfortunately, some were so poorly treated, that part is so sad and unforgivable, others were much luckier. Thank you for writing these stories, it will keep the memory of BRITISH HOME CHILDREN.. for generations to come… Mary Arnold, proud daughter of Nellie Page a Barnardo girl…..

  2. July 16, 2014 1:14 pm

    Mary, it’s always a joy to hear from you. Your enthusiasm for the stories of these children to be told encourages me. You are right. Their coming was Canada’s gain. And that’s a cause for celebration!

  3. Diana permalink
    July 16, 2014 10:32 pm

    Hi Rose, congrats on launching your book. I tried to reblog to my site http://www.connectionality.ca/ but the box offered to put in my blog link won’t “click,” ie, it offers no cursor or anything. I can’t paste or type anything in the box. I would like to put it on my blog. I already want to do a book report when I finish it… all good so far [am on pg 49]. Are you able to fix that reblog link box.

    blessings, Diana

    • July 17, 2014 1:18 pm

      Diana – if you hit the W button top left corner, click reader and from there it should take you to reblog. Is this what you did and it still wouldn’t work?

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  1. Announcing the Release of Rose McCormick Brandon’s book, “Promises of Home – Stories of Canada’s British Home Children | Connectionality

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